CARE MATTERS Podcast
CARE MATTERS: Improving Adult Care Together, Part 2

CARE MATTERS: Improving Adult Care Together, Part 2

May 4, 2022

We are pleased to bring you a two-part episode, hosted by IMPACT Director, Jon Glasby, focussing on the work being done in IMPACT (IMProving Adult Care Together), the new UK centre for implementing evidence in adult social care.  Funded, by the ESRC and the Health Foundation, with £15m over nearly 7 years, IMPACT seeks to help evidence of what works get used in practice to make a difference to services, and hence to people’s lives. 

"We believe that good care isn’t about services, but about having a life – and that evidence can play a key part in achieving this vision."

The University of Sheffield is a partner in IMPACT. IMPACT draws on knowledge gained from different types of research, the lived experience of people using services and carers, and the practice knowledge of social care staff.  

 

Part 2

 

Jon Glasby (Host)

Jon is a qualified social worker by background, and works as Professor of Health and Social Care at the University of Birmingham.  He is Director of IMPACT. Click here to learn more at Jon's profile page at the University of Birmingham.

 

Clenton Farquharson MBE

Clenton is a disabled person with lived experience who draws upon health and social care. Clenton employs his own Personal Assistance, and he looks after his mum's personal budget which his mum uses for her own personal assistance.

He is Chair of the Think Local Act Personal (click here to learn more) programme board, and member of the Coalition for Personalised Care. He is also a member of the Social Care Sector COVID-19 Stakeholder Group which will ensure that concerted and determined action continues to be taken to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 in the sector, both for those who rely on care and support and the social care workforce.

Clenton was named in Disability News Services’ list of influential disabled people and listed in the top 50 of HSJ’s most influential Black, Asian and minority ethnic people in health. He was also voted top social care leader in the recent Social Care Top 30 awards hosted by Care Talk magazine.

Karen Hedge

As National Director for Scottish Care (click here to learn more), Karen is working to shape the future of social care but is frustrated by the failure of traditional research to move beyond the ‘proof of concept’ stage. She believes IMPACT offers an exciting opportunity to reconsider our approach to evidence implementation by recognising the value and capability of the social care sector. Creating the conditions for real collaboration, critically including those who work in and access care and support, will allow us to move not only to research implementation but embedding. She brings over 20 years sector experience from frontline to Board level, and a passion for evidencing impact in outcomes for people.

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CIRCLE website: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/

---Intro/outro music: Ambient Cool by Sunsearcher is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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CARE MATTERS: Improving Adult Care Together, Part 1

CARE MATTERS: Improving Adult Care Together, Part 1

May 4, 2022

We are pleased to bring you a two-part episode, hosted by IMPACT Director, Jon Glasby, focussing on the work being done in IMPACT (IMProving Adult Care Together), the new UK centre for implementing evidence in adult social care.  Funded, by the ESRC and the Health Foundation, with £15m over nearly 7 years, IMPACT seeks to help evidence of what works get used in practice to make a difference to services, and hence to people’s lives. 

"We believe that good care isn’t about services, but about having a life – and that evidence can play a key part in achieving this vision."

The University of Sheffield is a partner in IMPACT. IMPACT draws on knowledge gained from different types of research, the lived experience of people using services and carers, and the practice knowledge of social care staff.  

Part one

Jon Glasby (Host)

Jon is a qualified social worker by background, and works as Professor of Health and Social Care at the University of Birmingham.  He is Director of IMPACT. Click here to learn more at Jon's profile page at the University of Birmingham.

Karen McCormick 

Karen is parent to you a young adult with an intellectual disability who draws on social care. In order to give her daughter more choice and control over her life, they have opted for a personal budget. The process of establishing her daughter’s self-direction arrangement to employ her own personal assistants motivated Karen to found inCharge Ltd in 2020 (www.inchargehq.com).  She believes that technology can play an enabling role in the self-directed care process.  Karen contributed to the work of the Northern Ireland IMPACT assembly in the design phase through her lived experience contributions to the temporary co-production advisory panel and is now Lived Experience Engagement Lead for IMPACT. 

Karen's LinkedIn Profile: www.linkedin.com/in/karenmccormickincharge

Twitter: @InCharge_HQ@killaney

Terry Davies 

Terry is an IMPACT Assembly member for Wales and is a person of lived experience, employed by West Wales Action for Mental Health (click here to visit their website).

Obert Tawodzera 

Obert is a Research Fellow at the University of Birmingham and IMPACT’s Project Officer. He completed his PhD at Sheffield University and was part of the Sustainable Care programme led by Professor Sue Yeandle. Prior to doing his PhD Obert worked as a care worker for adults with learning difficulties. His desire and passion to see change which is underpinned by inclusion and equality is what drives his commitment to research in adult social care.

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CIRCLE website: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/

---Intro/outro music: Ambient Cool by Sunsearcher is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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CARE MATTERS: The right to be me

CARE MATTERS: The right to be me

April 6, 2022

Maria Cheshire-Allen (Researcher, at Swansea University) is joined by Irene Mortimer, (Swansea Carers Centre) and Jude Dale, (Dementia Friendly Swansea) to discuss how the concept of wellbeing as an enduring ideal defining what it means to live a ‘good life’ interacts with how care in older age is understood and experienced.  Together, they reflect on whether, and how the concept translates into everyday experience or the ‘right to be me’ for family carers of older people living with dementia.

About Maria Cheshire-Allen

Maria is a qualitative researcher working at the Centre for Ageing and Dementia Research (CADR)- click here to go to the CADR website- at Swansea University, Wales UK.  Her research interests include ageing, care, care ethics, and social care policy.  Her research is informed by a previous career working in several policy and campaigning roles for NGOs in Wales, as well as working as a paid carer for older people with dementia.  She has published in the areas of theory, policy and empirical research addressing questions concerning the wellbeing of family carers.

Her latest research article ‘No-one was clapping for us’: care, social justice and family carer wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic in Wales  is published in the International Journal of Care and Caring and available to access here: (click here)

 

Useful links from this episode

The Dementia Hwb is part of Dementia Friendly Swanseaclick here to go to their website or click here for their Facebook page
The Dementia Hwb is also on Twitter (click here) and Instagram (click here)

Swansea Carers Centre website: https://www.swanseacarerscentre.org.uk/
Swansea Carers Centre Twitter (click here)Facebook (click here) and Instagram (click here)

 

CIRCLE website: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/

---Intro/outro music: Ambient Cool by Sunsearcher is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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CARE MATTERS: No Jab, No Job: 3 months on

CARE MATTERS: No Jab, No Job: 3 months on

February 1, 2022

Centre for Care Co-Investigator and Deputy Director of SPERI (Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute), Tom Hunt is joined by Rachel Harrison (Public Services National Officer, GMB) to discuss the issue of mandatory vaccination for care home workers in England. Since November last year, it has been mandatory for all care home staff in England to have had 2 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine as a condition of their deployment in a care home. The introduction of this policy has led to debate and concerns about the ethics of mandatory vaccination, it has also raised questions about the employment model in the care sector, about UK government's willingness to meaningfully engage with care workers and about the respect and value given to care work, and to the people providing it.

The policy has been in effect for 3 months, today's episode explores the impact so far, and what some of the wider implications might be.

Read Tom's paper, 'Under-paid and under-valued: assessing mandatory vaccination for care home workers' here: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/2021/10/27/scpaper-mandatory-vaccinations/ 

Rachel Harrison is GMB's Public Services National Officer, responsible for health and social care. 
Rachel has worked for GMB for 21 years, the last 3 1/2 in post as National Officer. 
 
Tom Hunt is a Co-Investigator at the ESRC Centre for Care and Deputy Director and Policy Research Associate at the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (SPERI) at the University of Sheffield. He is a Senior Fellow at Unions 21. Tom is co-leader of SPERI’s Labour and Decent Work research theme. His research focuses on the changing nature of work and the effects for workers.
 

GMB website: https://www.gmb.org.uk/
CIRCLE website: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/

---Intro/outro music: Ambient Cool by Sunsearcher is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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Digital Care Futures: Digital Shift and Connectivity

Digital Care Futures: Digital Shift and Connectivity

December 1, 2021

Digital Care Futures
3. Digital Shift and Connectivity

In this final episode of the Sustainable Care and TSA Digital Care Futures podcast, Kate Hamblin (University of Sheffield) and Tim Mulrey (TSA) spoke to guests from two local authorities that had explored how to promote digital connectivity and inclusion, and the implications for the ways they were using technology in adult social care.

our guests:

Ann Williams,
Commissioner and Contract Manager, Liverpool City Council

Geoff Connell,
Director of IMT & Chief Digital Officer,  Norfolk County Council

Sarah Rank,
Head of Business and Technology for Adult Social Services, Norfolk County Council

James Bullion,
Executive Director of Adult Social Services, Norfolk County Council

 

 

Learn more about Sustainable Care on our website: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/

---Intro/outro music: Ambient Cool by Sunsearcher is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
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Sustainable Care & COVID-19: Migrant Workers and the Delivery of Long Term Care in Austria, Australia and the UK

Sustainable Care & COVID-19: Migrant Workers and the Delivery of Long Term Care in Austria, Australia and the UK

November 25, 2021

Sustainable Care & COVID-19: Migrant Workers and the Delivery of Long Term Care in Austria, Australia and the UK

This episode is hosted by Professor Shereen Hussein from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and features special guests Professor Sara Charlesworth from RMIT University, Dr Ricardo Rodrigues from the European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research and Dr Agnes Turnpenny from Oxford Brookes University.

Shereen and Agnes worked together on the Sustainable Care programme, studying Migrant care workers in the UK: an analysis of care at homea work package led by Shereen. In this episode they discuss their findings and how the significant contribution made by migrants to the care sector in the UK has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Dr Ricardo Rodrigues gives background and context on the impact of COVID-19 in Austria, where there has been a reliance on migrant care workers since the late 1990s. Read more research from Ricardo on his profile page here.

Professor Sara Charlesworth gives insight from Australia where geography plays it's part and temporary visas for low skilled workers have created a void in the care workforce since Australia closed its borders due to the pandemic.

Learn more about Sustainable Care on our website: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/

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Digital Care Futures: Start ups and Innovators

Digital Care Futures: Start ups and Innovators

November 24, 2021

Digital Care Futures
2. Technology and Care: Startups and Innovators

Technology is fundamental to our everyday lives and is becoming increasingly ‘smart’ through the use of sensors, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and data collection and processing. There has been an explosion of new developments in the care and technology marketplace, with new devices, software and service models, focused on different consumers within the care ecosystem. 

Our Sustainable Care programme research found this marketplace is confusing and hard to navigate for commissioners of adult social care, care providers who are increasingly expected to include technology as part of their ‘offer’, and people who need support and their carers. With growing numbers of start-ups in the sector, there were concerns from purchasers – commissioners, care providers and people who use services – about sustainability and whether these ‘new players’ would be able to provide the same level of customer support as they grow their businesses. 

At the same time, our research found start-ups experienced challenges in making their way into the marketplace, with some commissioners of services felt to be risk-averse and allied with large, ‘dependable’ and established – but perhaps less innovative – organisations. Some commissioners were happy to pilot new approaches, but more cautious about investing at scale.

In Episode 2 of the Sustainable Care and TSA 'Digital Care Futures' podcast, Kate Hamblin (University of Sheffield) and Eve Solomon (TSA) spoke to guests from three very different start-ups, all using technologies to facilitate and support care, to explore some of the challenges and opportunities they had encountered. 

Neil Eastwood, founder and CEO of Care Friends, an employee referral app for social care. “a start-up like this is like a massive freight train in the station with a mini-engine and you’re screaming the mini-engine as much as you can to get some movement and eventually you start to get movement. Once you get momentum, life gets a lot easier because you can’t be stopped. But trying to get going, that’s the thing”

Hector Alexander, co-founder of Yokeru, which provides AI-driven automated voice call systems to care providers, including Local Authorities. “It's much easier if you know from the start this is a long-term game. It doesn’t take a few months- it takes years or more”

Darren Crombie, CEO and founder of Bridgit Care. Bridgit care provides a range of products and support aimed at assisting unpaid carers. “We say to our caring community ‘you’re not alone’ and I think as start-ups we need to remember- ‘you’re not alone- we’re part of a collective of people trying to innovate and make a difference”.

 

Learn more about Sustainable Care on our website: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/

---Intro/outro music: Ambient Cool by Sunsearcher is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
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Digital Care Futures: Commissioning differently: Evolving personalised care with technology

Digital Care Futures: Commissioning differently: Evolving personalised care with technology

November 17, 2021

Digital Care Futures
1. Commissioning differently: Evolving personalised care with technology

Traditionally most telecare, and now ‘technology enabled care services’ (TECS), focused on managing the risks associated with living in the community when people were older or requiring support. TECS helped people to ‘age in place’ at home when discharged from hospital or when living alone following a bereavement. These devices and services were often reactive, creating an alert in emergency situations, either relying on the person triggering an alarm or the system automatically detecting changes in the home environment. There is now a distinct shift in approach in the UK from reactive to proactive and preventative services. Technologies are becoming ‘smarter’ and better able to relay information captured through a wider array of sensors and ‘Internet of Things’ devices. The design of services around the technology is also developing, using data gathered in more predictive and preventative ways as well as shifting towards ‘proactive’, in-bound calling systems. There is also a growing interest in mainstream devices and the role they can play in supporting people to live well in their communities and homes. 

Findings from the Sustainable Care programme research from the University of Sheffield and from the TSA’s experience of engaging with the sector highlighted examples of local authorities and councils exploring and investing in TECS for prevention, taking a proactive approach as well as being focused on the wellbeing of those receiving support. The TSA has also observed in the past 12 months a rapidly growing appetite for more proactive services, both from adult social care commissioners and also people receiving support and their carers. However, this has been met with varying levels of technical service maturity and challenges, including issues related to interoperability, workforce pressures and limited capacity for analysis of the vast amounts of data generated and evidence-based decision making.

 

In this first episode of the Sustainable Care and TSA 'Digital Care Futures' podcast, Kate Hamblin (University of Sheffield) and Nathan Downing (TSA) spoke to guests from two examples of services which take a proactive and preventative approach.

Our guests: 

Rupert Lawrence, former head of amica24, now Operations Director for the TSA

Carla Dix, TEC Prevention Strategy Manager, Delta Wellbeing Ltd.

 

Learn more about Sustainable Care at our website: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/

---Intro/outro music: Ambient Cool by Sunsearcher is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
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Sustainable Care & COVID-19: Homecare during the pandemic: how can technology aid care provision?

Sustainable Care & COVID-19: Homecare during the pandemic: how can technology aid care provision?

November 16, 2021

Sustainable Care & COVID-19: Homecare during the pandemic: how can technology aid care provision?

Dr Diane Burns introduces this episode in which Sustainable Care researchers, Dr Cate Goodlad and Dr Kate Hamblin, are joined by Tommy Henderson-Reay from the National Care Forum. They discuss emerging models of homecare delivery in the UK, the various ways homecare providers deployed technologies during the pandemic and the challenges they faced.

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Dr Diane Burns is a Senior Lecture at the Management School at the University of Sheffield and she Led the research project, 'Delivering care at home: emerging models and their implications for sustainability and wellbeing' as part of the Sustainable Care Programme. Dr Cate Goodlad also worked on this project with Diane.

Dr Kate Hamblin is a Research Fellow at the Centre for International Research on Care, Labour and Equalities (CIRCLE) and led the research project 'Achieving sustainability in care systems: the potential of technology'.

Tommy Henderson-Reay is Digital Transformation Lead at the National Care Forum, he is part of the Digital Social Care project and is also a registered social worker.

 

Useful links mentioned in/relating to this episode:

Sustainable Care & COVID-19: Technology Enabled Care Services and the pandemic: a catalyst for change

Sustainable Care & COVID-19: Technology Enabled Care Services and the pandemic: a catalyst for change

November 8, 2021

Sustainable Care Co-Investigator, Dr Kate Hamblin is joined by special guests Mark Allen, Head of Technology Enabled Care, Hampshire County Council and Alyson Scurfield, Chief Executive, TEC Services Association (TSA).

In this episode, Kate explores how the pandemic has been a catalyst for change for the Technology Enabled Care sector. Mark Allen gives great insight on how Hampshire County Council used technology during a time of unprecedented change and demand, reflecting on what the sector might learn from the crisis. Alyson Scurfield provides an industry-wide perspective on the pandemic’s impact for TSA members, TEC’s support to vulnerable communities and how the TSA supported the TEC sector with an intense outreach programme and obtaining key worker status for its workforce.

 

Links mentioned in/relating to this episode

  1. The joint ADASS-TSA Commission Findings and Recommendations – “How Can Technology Be Truly Integrated into Adult Social Care - https://www.tsa-voice.org.uk/adass-tsa-comm/
  2. The TSA Sector Insight Report - https://www.tsa-voice.org.uk/campaigns/download-the-tsa-sector-insight-report-2020/
  3. The TSA Leadership Report – strategic priorities for the TEC sector to 2025 - https://www.tsa-voice.org.uk/campaigns/leadership-report/

Learn more about Sustainable Care on our website: http://circle.group.shef.ac.uk/

---Intro/outro music: Ambient Cool by Sunsearcher is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
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